smoking-vs-vaping-comparison

The difference between smoking vs vaping

in News

The difference between smoking vs vaping is that smoking delivers nicotine by burning tobacco, which can cause smoking-related illnesses, and vaping can deliver nicotine by heating a liquid in a much less harmful way.

According to Johns Hopkins Medicine, vaping may be slightly less harmful than smoking. They note that a person who smokes inhales about 7,000 chemicals, whereas vaping likely involves a lower number of chemicals.

The AHATrusted Source note that vaping liquids contain fewer contaminants than cigarettes. However, they also state that vaping is not safe due to the following reasons:

  • E-cigarettes contain a large dose of nicotine, a substance known to slow the development of brains in fetuses, children, and teens.
  • The liquid that creates the vapor is dangerous to adults and children if they swallow or inhale it or get it on their skin.
  • Vaping also delivers several dangerous chemicals, including diacetyl, cancer-causing chemicals, heavy metals, and volatile organic compounds (VOCs).
  • Vaping may normalize smoking again as it becomes more popular.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)Trusted Source, by early 2020, there had been a total of 2,807 hospitalizations or deaths from vaping.

However, the CDC also acknowledge that since the removal of vitamin E acetate from vaping products, along with other harmful ingredients, the number of symptoms that people experience from vaping has declined.

Unlike vaping, which is relatively new, there are years of research to fully back up claims that smoking is damaging to human health. According to the CDCTrusted Source, smoking causes:

  • damage to every organ in the body
  • more than 480,000 deaths a year in the United States
  • 90% of all lung cancer deaths
  • about 80% of deaths from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)
  • an increased risk of death
  • an increased risk of developing health conditions, such as heart disease and stroke

Long-term effects of smoking

Smoking has many adverse effects on the body in the long term. The CDCTrusted Source report that smoking:

  • reduces sperm count
  • increases the risk of pregnancy loss or congenital disabilities
  • increases the risk of cataracts
  • impairs immune system function
  • increases general inflammation
  • can cause cancer in nearly any part of the body, including the lungs, kidneys, and stomach
  • triggers asthma attacks
  • causes blockages in veins and arteries
  • increases the risk of stroke
  • reduces the overall health of a person, causing issues such as missed work and increased healthcare costs